Tying the Improved Clinch Knot, FOTW and the GUIDE REPORT


If you've been viewing our content lately you know we've been consistently dissecting as much water as possible. When we say we, both the guide staff and shop crew are included. Around here, those lines blur a little bit! 

Currently the South Platte dry-fly fishing is heating up! Sparsely tied BWO's have been productive in the afternoon if the conditions align. If you're looking to find fish sub-surface with a nymph rig we've been finding success with #20 Rojo Midges in red, #22 Darth baetis in brown and #18 foam wing emergers's like the chocolate thunder & massacre midge. If those flies don't produce it's hard to go wrong with a coffee & black rubber leg drifted and fished on the swing!

If you're looking to stay local, we have a few thoughts: This time of year is special for front range residents because most of our lakes in town have iced off and there's plenty of bass water to find! Usually when you find Bass (largemouth or smallmouth) you will also find carp. These warm water species provide great targets for those looking to keep it local and change paces from the normal trout beats. The best thing to do is to locate a blue blob on google maps and pursue it with a balanced leech, a wooly bugger or small crayfish. After all, the most rewarding outings are ones you do all the leg-work on!

If you're a streamer junkie at heart hope you're making some time to fish this spring. Fish are chowing and there's no turning back. As the seasonal weather fluctuates be sure to take note on the flows and water temps on the water you're fishing. Logging time on the water in similar conditions often means you can look back at past experiences and replicate the results...

For example: Spring day - Partly cloudy -

Water 48 degrees - Olive Streamer.

These details are what make a good day on the water, a great one. If it's pattern advice you're after or a glimpse at our "wall of meat," swing into the shop and re-stock those holes in your streamer box!

NEW VIDEO!

Next up on the knot tying journey is the "Improved clinch knot."

The Improved Clinch knot is a great fishing knot to know and is best utilized when you are dealing with stiff materials that don't seat well with the basic Clinch Knot. Simply run the tag end back through the "D-loop" created when you tie the Clinch Knot and viola, you have the improved clinch knot.

You might encounter a situation that calls for an improved clinch knot when you find yourself saltwater fly fishing, streamer fishing, or when the diameter of the hook eye is noticeably different than the leader/tippet material you're working with.

FLY OF THE WEEK:

-- Tungsten Jigged Hare's Ear -- 

This weeks FOTW is the Tungsten Jigged Hare's Ear from Umpqua Feather Merchants. This fly is the swiss army knife of nymph's and is effective in still-water and moving water alike. 

The Gold-Ribbed Hare’s Ear Nymph is a sentimental favorite for most anglers. It is often one of the first flies a tyer learns which often results in it being one of the first flies the angler uses to catch a fish. No angler forgets that moment. Its effectiveness comes from the naturally spikey hare’s mask dubbing with its natural tans & grays along with just enough flash from the tinsel ribbing to bring some attention to it as it drifts. It is an extremely versatile fly that imitates many insects and is available in a classic Gold-Ribbed, Bead Head and Tungsten Jigged versions.

SUGGESTED MATERIAL LIST:

  •  60 degree jig
  • Bead: Slotted Tungsten
  •  Danville 70
  • Tail: Hare's Mask
  • Body: Hare's - Natural
  • Rib: Gold Tinsel
  • Thorax: Hare's Mask - Natural 
  •  w/ Flashback

Suggested Tools: vise, scissors, bobbin, bodkin,
brush, whip finish, Super Glue or UV Glue

 

Remember that a material list is a good starting point but feel free to adapt the fly design for your needs!